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Rough Country 3 in. Suspension Lift Kit w/ Lifted N3 Struts (05-15 Tacoma Pre-Runner; 05-20 4WD Tacoma)

Item TT1877
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Market Price $623.99 You Save 17% ($104.04)
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$519.95 (kit)

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    Features, Video & Details

    • Provides 3 Inches of Front Lift and 2 Inches of Rear Lift
    • Increases Ground Clearance
    • Maintains Factory Ride Quality
    • Lifted N3 Struts
    • Durable 2-Inch Rear Lift Blocks
    • Billet Aluminum Strut Spacers
    • Accommodates up to 265/70 R17 Tires on Factory Wheels
    • Direct Fit Installation
    • Backed by 3-Year Limited Warranty
    • Fits 2005 to 2019 Tacoma Pre-Runner and 4WD Toyota Tacoma Models

    Review & Installation Video

    Review & Install Video

    Hey, guys. This is Joe from Extreme Terrain. And today, I'm gonna be reviewing and showing you how to install the Rough Country 3-inch suspension lift kit with lifted N3 struts fitting all '05 and newer four-wheel drive Tacomas and '05 to '15 pre-runners. This is going to be for the Tacoma owner who's looking for a lift kit that's in the middle ground. You're going to get some ride height. You're going to be able to fit some bigger tires. You're going to get some better offroad performance, and all for a budget-friendly price. This kit features Rough Country's N3 nitrogen charge shocks on all four corners. Now that nitrogen charge is going to give the superior heat dissipation and, therefore, resist shocks fade if these are taking a lot of impact on the trails better than the factory shock would.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Now, that is going to come at the slight cost of ride quality. While this is still a very daily drivable kit, there is a bit of a trade-off between daily drivability and offroad performance. The lift for this kit in the front is going to come from these lifted struts here. We're moving the position of these cups a little bit higher to allow us to use the factory spring and still see a lift. Lift in the rear is gonna come from these durable 2-inch rear lift blocks here. So, all in all, we're looking at a 3-inch lift in the front and a 2-inch lift in the rear. Now, that is going to help bring the truck level.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Now, all Tacomas and trucks for that matter come with a little bit of rake in them, meaning the rear is going to sit a little bit higher than the front of the truck. Now, the idea there is to counteract any weight added into the bed. Or if you're towing something, it levels out at that point. But if you're not towing very often, it's more of a looks thing, and this kit is going to lift our truck, in general, and bring it to level as well. This lift will allow you to fit some bigger tires under the Tacoma as well around a 31.6-inch tire. Specifically, in tire sizing, that's going to be a 265/75R16. Or if you have the 17s, which is what it is on our Tacoma today, that's going to be a 265/75R17. Now, just to show you guys what it might look like, we did put 33s on our Tacoma. And on level ground, it didn't impact anything. But if you're on a trail under full articulation, this will probably catch a fender liner, so just a word of warning, and I would recommend sticking within those factory limits of around 31.6 inches.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Pricing for this kit is going to be around the $500 mark, and that's exactly where to expect a nitrogen shock kit like this one to land. And, again, this makes for a great middle grounder. But if you do plan on tackling some of the tougher trails and going out on almost a weekly basis, but I would recommend stepping it up, taking a look at some of the other kits we have on the site. Take a look at one with drop knuckles, maybe skid plates, cross members, and even some reservoir shocks. That would get you to where you need to be to tackle those tougher trails but do expect to pay quadruple the price. Now, on the opposite end of the spectrum, if you were looking to save a couple hundred bucks, Rough Country offers this same kit but replaces the front-end three struts with some lift spacers instead.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">That would get the job done for an even more reasonable price. Included in the price tag of this one, though, is also a three-year manufacturer's warranty from Rough Country. Install for this is going to easily get a three-out-of-three. We're going to be seriously digging into the suspension components of our Tacoma here, and we are going to be disassembling a strut assembly so you will need a spring compressor. A lift also makes this exponentially easier, but it should take you about a day to do it. Budget a little bit more time if you are working on jack stands. But without any further ado, let me show you how to get this installed on your Tacoma.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Tools we use for this install are going to be a basic ratcheting wrench set, but we did need an open-ended 19-millimeter wrench, a basic socket set, 19-millimeter crow's foot, ratchet, safety glasses, sharpie, spray paint, torque wrench, pry bar, vice grips, needle nose pliers, cut-off wheel, hammer, and an impact. And the first step, obviously, we're going to use a 21-millimeter socket and remove all four of our wheels. After that, we're going to use a 13-millimeter socket to remove our brake line bracket.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Next, we're going to get started on our tie rod. I'm gonna use some needle nose pliers to bend back that cotter pin, and then we should be able to remove the nut. We're probably gonna have to hit this with a hammer, and this should drop right out. So, next, we're going to get our tie rod out of the way. This castle nut is a 19-millimeter. Now, this collar for the tie rod is a little bit tapered and that's what's holding this in right now. So we're going to hit that with a hammer, run a little shock through it, and it should release.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Next, we're going to remove this 17-millimeter nut on the lower side of our sway bar end link. We're going to do that for the driver's side as well. Once that's released, we should be able to swing our sway bar up and out of the way. So now we're just going to remove this upper ball joint here. We're going to get this cotter pin out of the way, then drop that nut, hit this cotter with a hammer, and we should be able to separate that from our upper control arm. So, we're gonna leave that nut on there and just hit this cotter again with the mini-sledge, and it should release just like the tie rod. So, with the weight and the knuckle on the nut, we can now remove this. We've a pole jack underneath just to catch it and from stressing our brake lines.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Before we drop our brake assembly, you just wanna remove this brake line from its holding bracket right here on the upper control arm. So, at this point, we're almost ready to start working on our strut assembly. But before we do, we have to hop back to the other side as our sway bar is hitting the upper control arm on the other side. So, we're going to undo that and allow this to swing all the way up and out of the way. So, on the opposite side, we just undid our upper ball joint, and that's going to allow us to get a lot more play out of that sway bar. So, with our suspension completely taken apart, we can now move on to removing the strut. There's three, 14-millimeter bolts on top, and then we're going to undo this bolt on the bottom. And it should drop right out.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So now to undo the lower, we're gonna grab one end with that 19-millimeter wrench, and the nut is also 19-millimeters. And with that, we are able to pull out our strut assembly, and then we're going to do the same thing for the other side. So, next, we're gonna do the same thing to the driver's side. We're going to undo the three, 14-millimeter bolts up top, 19 on the bottom, and drop up the driver's side strut assembly. So, before we move on to the spring compressor, we're actually gonna work on our differential drop. Now, in order to get at that, we're going to remove the four, 12-millimeter bolts from our skid plate.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, now we have clear access to our differential brackets. You could see where our drop is going to install. But in order to do that, we have to take off our skid plate reinforcement. This lip here is going to impact the bracket for our differential. So, we're gonna have to cut that away, but we only have to do that for the driver's side. So, we're gonna loosen up these four, 17-millimeter bolts, drop that out, make our cut, reinstall this, and drop our differential. So, now, we have our skid plate reinforcement cut. And, again, that cut should be about one-inch deep by 4.5 inches back. We filed it. Now we're going to remove the painter's tape that I use to show you guys what line I was cutting on, hit this with a little paint to keep it from corroding, and then reinstall it on the truck. So, now, we can use that factory 17-millimeter hardware to reinstall our skid plate reinforcement.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, now, we're going to drop the diff a little bit and install our spacers. Now, we're gonna be removing this bolt here. There's also one on the other side. It's a 19-millimeter nut up top, and the bolt is a 22. So, now I just dropped that pole jack a little bit, and now we're going to install our spacer in between that bushing and the frame. And then Rough Country gives us a new hardware to secure that back to the frame. And then we're going to do the same thing for the other side. Now, our new hardware has a 19-millimeter nut up top and the bolt is 19-millimeters as well.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">And with everything tightened down, we can now hang and reinstall our skid plate using that factory 12-millimeter hardware. So, now we have our strut assembly on the spring compressor. And what we're going to do is compress this then use a 17-millimeter wrench to get that nut off the top then we can transfer our spring over to our new strut. So, now that we have the nut off the top of our strut removed, we should be able to drop that through the spring and straight out. And this kit comes with new washers and bushings, so we can get rid of the factory ones on the hat. Then we can put the hat back on top of the spring, and insert our new strut up through making sure that there's one bushing and washer on either side.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, now, we got a pair of vice grips on top. We're retightening that down with a 19-millimeter wrench. The new hardware in the kit is 19-millimeters. You just wanna make sure that this top hat is seated on that upper coil correctly, and that the bottom cup also meets the bottom coil in the same fashion. And this nut doesn't need to go too far, only about 35 foot-pounds. Once you feel you've hit that, you can release the vice grip, take the wrench out, and release the compression on the spring. So, now, we're going to line up the hat and the cup and release the tension on the spring. So, now, we're just going to repeat the same process for the other side. So, again, we're going to tighten that top nut to around 35 foot-pounds, and then we can loosen up the tension on the spring.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, now, we can reinstall our new strut assembly and secure the top with the 14-millimeter hardware we removed earlier and the bottom with the 19-millimeter hardware. And the bottom bolt goes to 100 foot-pounds. So, now, what we did here is we lowered the truck on new floor jack. That's to compress up our lower control arm and allow us to get that upper ball joint seated and the castle nut back on. So, this upper ball joint nut gets torqued to 40 foot-pounds and then gets the original cotter pin. So, now, we're going to reinstall our tie rod. You can push that back into the collar, and then secure it with that factory 19-millimeter castle nut.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">And that castle nut gets torqued to 65 foot-pounds. Next, we're going to tighten down our brake line brackets using a 12 and 10-millimeter socket. As far as our sway bar goes, we're gonna get the other side buttoned up and wait to do that until the very end. And, again, that bottom bolt gets torqued to 100 foot-pounds. So, again, on this side, we lowered the truck and then jacked up the lower control arm, got that knuckle seated in the upper control arm, and now we're tightening back the original castle nut onto this ball joint. And then that nut gets torqued to 40 foot-pounds and gets the original cotter pin.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, now, we have the truck back up in the air. We're going to get our tie rod back in place and torque down that castle nut. So, next, we're going to put our brake line brackets back together and torque the sway bar end links to 52 foot-pounds on both sides. So, now, we have the front all back together. We can move onto the rear, and the first thing we're going to remove is the shock. The bottom bolt is a 17-millimeter. Same thing goes for the nut. The top is a 14. But before you remove those, make sure you support your rear axle with a pole jack, jack stand, or floor jack just to relieve some of the weight and tension off of that shock.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, for the top, again, this is a 14-millimeter nut. What I'm gonna do is put the wrench on and then put a pair of vice grips. You could use a small wrench. Two, put a pair of vice grips around the top to keep it from rotating, and then you should be able to loosen this nut. Now, once you have the nut off, you could pull down. The bushing will fall off and so will your shock. So, next, we're going to loosen up the nuts on our U-bolts. Those are 19-millimeters. Remember, it's always a good idea to do those in an X pattern. Then we're gonna drop the axle down a little bit, and slide in our lift block.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, with the axle sufficiently dropped, we can now push that spacer in. You wanna make sure that the posts line up and that the block is sitting flush against the axle end on the leaf spring. There is a very slight taper to this. Make sure that's going toward the front of the vehicle. So, small side, front of vehicle. So, now, the lift block's in place. We can go ahead and put our new U-bolts around. Make sure this clamp here is installed on the axle, just like factory, and secure it with a new hardware, nut lock nuts, and flat washers. Now, just like changing a car tire, we're going to tighten these down in an X pattern. These require a 22-millimeter socket and get torqued to about 90 foot-pounds. So, now, we're ready to install our rear shock. And real quick, I just wanted to point out the order of the bushings on this.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, we have our upward facing cup, then the bushing with the collar also facing up. Then it's going to be where our shock actually attaches to the frame up there. Then we're gonna put our top bushing on with the collar facing down, then the cup facing down and secure with this nut included in the kit. And then we're gonna tighten down that nut with a 14-millimeter wrench. And with the top in place, we're going to use the stock hardware to reinstall the bottom bolt on the bottom of the shock. And, again, on this side, we're going to start with the bottom of the shock using a 17-millimeter wrench and socket to remove the bottom bolt. And then again for the top, we're gonna use a pair of vice grips to grab on to make sure it doesn't spin and a 14-millimeter wrench to loosen up that nut. Then we're gonna loosen up our U-bolts using a 19-millimeter socket and drop down our pole jack. And then push in our lift block, again, taper facing the front of the vehicle. And now, we're going to install our U-bolts just like on the other side.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Moving on, next is going to be the driver's side rear shock. So, we got our bushing and cup seated. I'm just gonna get that started in the bottom and then install the top bushing cup and nut. So, now we're just going to reinstall this bottom bolt here and hit it with the impact gun. So, with our lift kit completely buttoned up, I just wanted to take a second to go over this, point out where the lift is coming from, what key improvements we made, and kind of compare what we did to a stock Tacoma. And starting with the front, the position of this spring perch right here is going to be where the lift comes from.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Now, if I hold our factory strut up and I have the bottoms aligned right about there, you could see that this difference in where the spring perches is what's going to contribute to the front lift on this truck. Now, on top of that, we're also increasing the diameter of this front strut, which is going to add to the volume, making sure that this resists cavitation and stays cool as possible. Now, when you lift a truck like this with the spring perch, it adds a little bit of angle to the axle. Now, that axle can sometimes pull out, and that's an extremely bad thing. Now, what this kit comes with is that differential drop that we installed earlier, which is going to bring the CV axle a little bit more level and make sure it doesn't fall out, even under extreme articulation.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, in the rear, we added a 2-inch lift block in between our axle tube and leaf spring, and we also have those extended U-bolts to accommodate for that, but the shock Rough Country N3 is gonna accommodate for that added lift as well. And if I hold the stock shot up next to that, you could see just how much longer it is. I got the bottom lined up here, and you can see there's a good three inches added in length with a Rough Country N3 shock. Now, on top of being longer for the lift, the Rough Country increases the diameter of the shock tube as well. And that's going to add to the amount of fluid inside, which is going to help, on top of the nitrogen charge, help keep this cool, resist cavitation, and, therefore, shock-free. And then for the very last step, we're going to reinstall the wheels.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">And that is going to do it for my review and install of the Rough Country 3-inch suspension lift kit with lifted N3 struts fitting all '05 and newer four-wheel-drive Tacomas and '05 to '15 pre-runners. Thanks for watching. I'm Joe. And for all things Tacoma, keep it right here at extremeterrain.com.

    Delivers Superior Lift Solution. The Rough Country 3 inch Suspension Lift Kit with Lifted N3 Struts is designed to improve the Tacoma’s looks and off-road capabilities. Not only does it provide a level stance, it allows for mounting larger tires. Additionally, it comes with a set of premium lifted N3 struts for excellent performance on and off-road.

    Premium N3 Struts. The kit’s lifted N3 struts feature 10-stage variable valving with high-pressure nitrogen charge. This delivers outstanding performance for highway and off-road applications. It’s exceptionally well-built for heavy duty use and has great heat dissipation to reduce shock fade.

    Billet Aluminum Strut Spacers and Fabricated Rear Blocks. The kit’s strut spacers and lift blocks are precision-made from high-grade materials. Not only do they provide a precise, level stance – they’re tough and durable for long-lasting service.

    All Bolt-On Installation. This 3 inch Suspension Lift Kit with Lifted N3 Struts is quite straightforward to install and requires no drilling or welding. Note that after installation the Tacoma must be aligned to factory specification.

    Backed by 3-Year Limited Warranty. The Lifted N3 Struts are backed by a 3-year limited warranty. All other hard suspension components are backed by Rough Country’s Limited Lifetime Replacement warranty.

    Application. The Rough Country 3 inch Suspension Lift Kit with Lifted N3 Struts is designed to fit 2005 to 2015 Tacoma Pre-Runner as well as the 2005-2019 4WD Toyota Tacoma models.

    Fitment: 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Details

    MPN# 74531

    CA Residents: WARNING: Cancer and Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

    What's in the Box
    • (2) Strut Spacers
    • (2) Rear Lift Blocks
    • (2) Differential Spacers
    • (2) Rear N3 Series Shocks
    • Installation Hardware
    Installation Info
    Will it fit my Tacoma?
    • 2.7L I4 - 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
    • 3.5L V6 - 16, 17, 18, 19
    • 4.0L V6 - 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

    It is not compatible with T/X Baja or XSP-X Models.

      Customer Photos (2) Submit Your Photo

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        Questions & Answers (17)

        5 Top Rated Questions

        What other parts will I need? And relocators or drops necessary?

        • The Rough Country 3 in. Suspension Lift Kit will not require any additional components to complete installation. We highly recommend getting a professional four-wheel alignment. 

        Helpful (4)

        You mention that it will lift 3" in the front and 2" in the back. Will the truck be level is my question. I want it to be level. I have a 2019 Tacoma off road. Thanks CG

        • Yes, the 3" lift in the front and 2" in the back will level out your Tacoma.

        Helpful (4)

        Does this kit include differential spacers? Thanks.

        • This kit does indeed feature 2 differential spacers.

        Helpful (3)

        Can this be used on a trd package Tacoma ?

        • As long it is a 6 lug truck it will. And it is not a BAJA Edition.

        Helpful (3)

        Will I have to change upper contro arms or factory ok I have 2019 Tacoma off road

        • Your factory control arms will be okay.

        Helpful (3)
        Post Your Question
        10 More Questions
        So this setup doesn’t work for my 2019 2wd trd sport? 0 answer
        I have a 3rd generation 2019 tacoma trd sport 4x4 4 door short bed. Your kit says it gives 3 inches of lift in the front 2 in the rear. My question is, since the 3rd gen's have a 1 inch lift from the factory, will this kit give an additional 3 inches in front and 2 in the rear (I am assuming a net lift of 4 inches front, 3 inches rear of lift overall) or does the 3 inches and 2 inches include that factory 1 inch lift? 1 answer
        In the video you mention that there is a slight trade off from daily drivability and off road performance, are you talking about gas mileage or just the way the truck feels after having the suspension changed? I have a 2012 off road tacoma 1 answer
        Will I have to change the upper control arms? I have a 2010 Tacoma 1 answer
        So this lift will allow 285/75/16 (32.8") tires with no other modifications or metal cutting? 0 answer
        Can I run 33" tires with this setup or will I need to add or trim anything? 0 answer
        Are the differential spacers necessary on a 2 wheel drive? 1 answer
        Will this kit work with a 2019 Tacoma SR? Any conflicts with Toyota Safe Sense (TSS)? 1 answer
        Will this trip the tss sensor located in the grill after installing. 1 answer
        Will this kit cause any error codes on a 2018 1 answer

          Customer Reviews (4) Write a Review

          Overall Rating 5

          out of 5 stars

          Installation Time:Weekend

          Installation Cost:$250-$500

          • Appearance 5 5
          • Bang For Your Buck 5 5
          • Onroad Ride Quality 5 5
          • Offroad Capability 5 5



          • 5/5

            Installation Time: Weekend

            April 22, 2019

            Bang for your Buck

            This lift is awesome! Bang for your buck. It gives my 2017 Tacoma a great stance. I will say, if installing yourself you should have a buddy help you out. Great product and crazy fast shipping. Have yet to take it off road...coming soon though.

            Saul

            Year: 2017Submodel: SR5

            Helpful (0)

          • 5/5

            Installation Time: Shop Install

            March 26, 2019

            The perfect lift

            This lift gave my truck just enough lift to make it a fun and comfortable riding 4×4 experience.

            Amazing

            Year: 2011

            Helpful (0)

          • 5/5

            Installation Time: Shop Install

            Installation Cost: $250-$500

            February 06, 2019

            Very happy

            I had this 3 inch Rough Country lift kit installed on my 2015 Tacoma. I am very happy the look and handling. I would definitely recommend this kit from Extreme Terrian.

            NorbertoRivera

            Year: 2015Submodel: Base

            Helpful (3)

          • 5/5

            Installation Time: Full Day

            January 17, 2019

            Very good kit

            Great kit hat on my first Tacoma now going on my second one rides just like factory ran 265/75/16 ko2s

            JacobH

            Year: 2017

            Helpful (7)